Sunday, 8 March 2009

when we were very young

Oh. My. Goodness.

The Terrible Twos are F-ING TERRIBLE, aren't they? How long do they last? Given that we are starting them six months early? And can I put my head in a bag for the next x number of years until he leaves home?

DO children leave home these days? Because if they don't, I am.




15 comments:

  1. I was chatting with someone the other day. She said her girls are 12 and 14 and she's going through the menopause, so it's Hormone City in her house!

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  2. I was chatting with someone the other day. She said her girls are 12 and 14 and she's going through the menopause, so it's Hormone City in her house!

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  3. Just switch your brain off and dump him in his room. As you learn to stave off the tantrums and he learns that they don't work, he'll turn into a lovely little boy. Sad that they become teenagers, mind you.

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  4. Just switch your brain off and dump him in his room. As you learn to stave off the tantrums and he learns that they don't work, he'll turn into a lovely little boy. Sad that they become teenagers, mind you.

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  5. This is good practice, ally, for the teenage years! But, at least at the moment, you Can pick him up and put him in his room, after this age, nada. x

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  6. The terrible twos for boys start now and crescendo at 22.

    You know it makes sense.

    Just remember, the louder they shout at you, the more it means they suspect you to be indestructible and the harder they think they have to work. In other words you win, whatever, and can move mountains with the flick of a disapproving eyebrow, which makes it a little easier to sit back and chuckle (albeit like a loony, in the corner, rocking and singing 'I'm a little teapot').

    Muahahahaha

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  7. The terrible twos for boys start now and crescendo at 22.

    You know it makes sense.

    Just remember, the louder they shout at you, the more it means they suspect you to be indestructible and the harder they think they have to work. In other words you win, whatever, and can move mountains with the flick of a disapproving eyebrow, which makes it a little easier to sit back and chuckle (albeit like a loony, in the corner, rocking and singing 'I'm a little teapot').

    Muahahahaha

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  8. AAaaaww Cheryl don't say that!I've been dancing round my house singing 'four weeks to go' as my little boy near three.......

    Cath

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  9. AAaaaww Cheryl don't say that!I've been dancing round my house singing 'four weeks to go' as my little boy near three.......

    Cath

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  10. The twos are tough, but it gets worse. I swear to you it's all worth it in the end.

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  11. The twos are tough, but it gets worse. I swear to you it's all worth it in the end.

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  12. my son is 21 now and just about fit for human consumption

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  13. my son is 21 now and just about fit for human consumption

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  14. I found it was often useful, especially if the tantrum's built up a bit, to pick the child up and hug them. They often get to a point where they don't know how to get out of the tantrum and this can actually be quite frightening for them.
    A big firm hug with very calm soothing noises shows them you still love them, and that you're still in control however bad the tantrum was.
    Now teenage daughters - that's really bad.

    Oh, and in my experience, they don't ever leave home.

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  15. I found it was often useful, especially if the tantrum's built up a bit, to pick the child up and hug them. They often get to a point where they don't know how to get out of the tantrum and this can actually be quite frightening for them.
    A big firm hug with very calm soothing noises shows them you still love them, and that you're still in control however bad the tantrum was.
    Now teenage daughters - that's really bad.

    Oh, and in my experience, they don't ever leave home.

    ReplyDelete