Monday, 9 February 2009

visualisation


The sky is a perfect shade of blue overhead. The sun is warm and feels as if it is wrapping me in in it's arms. I am lying in the long grass. I can smell the fresh-crushed-grass smell from the broken stems around me and see the wide, furry stems with their tassled plumes rising above me. There are ladybirds and ants wandering up and down the tangles.

I can see nothing but the grass and the sky. A little way away I can hear Pa and some helpers stacking glass and moving the wires for the chrysanthemums and stocks around on the concrete pad by the old stoke hole. The concrete is quite old. There are cracks in it and moss growing on it and I know it's very hot under the sun. They are talking as they are working; I don't know about what and I'm not interested enough to listen any harder. I am relishing in being hidden from them - I am sure that they know I am there; but I am completely private. No-one can see me, hidden in my nest as I am, like a leveret or a plover.

I must be about eight.

I can conjure the memory up from thirty years ago as if it was yesterday - the smells, the sounds, everything.

That's the place I want to build my house. Down by the old stoke hole at the bottom of greenhouse Number Five. There's a long strip there covering the place where the stoke hole was and the patch of concrete is, now mostly grown over. It faces south. It won't impinge on agricultural ground, it's tucked down there below the blackcurrant patch and beside the brambly trees.

I hope the planners feel the same way.

8 comments:

  1. I don't want to discourage you, but don't get too lost in dreams. Planners hate giving permission to build even if there's plenty of room. When we wanted to put a bungalow for my mother-in-law here, we had great difficulty in getting permission. Eventually, they allowed an annexe to be built on with a connecting door, and a covenant that only a close family member could ever live in it. They said that the house and its 13 acres are not in the village envelope and therefore not designated for building. It made no sense, but we had to work with them and not fight them to get anywhere at all.

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  2. I don't want to discourage you, but don't get too lost in dreams. Planners hate giving permission to build even if there's plenty of room. When we wanted to put a bungalow for my mother-in-law here, we had great difficulty in getting permission. Eventually, they allowed an annexe to be built on with a connecting door, and a covenant that only a close family member could ever live in it. They said that the house and its 13 acres are not in the village envelope and therefore not designated for building. It made no sense, but we had to work with them and not fight them to get anywhere at all.

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  3. I know, Z - this is my ideal. There is also an 'extension within the existing curtilage' option that we could go for. And I am prepared to look at the possibility of agricultural ties and family coventants all that sort of stuff. We have decided to go for what we'd ideally like and be prepared to compromise drastically with them. I agree that working with them is the only way - there's no point fighting them.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I know, Z - this is my ideal. There is also an 'extension within the existing curtilage' option that we could go for. And I am prepared to look at the possibility of agricultural ties and family coventants all that sort of stuff. We have decided to go for what we'd ideally like and be prepared to compromise drastically with them. I agree that working with them is the only way - there's no point fighting them.

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  5. It sounds wonderful to me. It's good that you will have a separate house. I do so wish that my parent's house had an annexe of some description. I get on well with my parents, but with the best will in the world you get on one another's nerves at times. Especially as the 'invalid daughter'. I miss having my own (rented) home, even after two and a half years here, or perhaps especially after that!
    Just having your own front door is a wonderful thing. I have a room which is both bedroom and sitting room, and my own shower room, but even so, it's not the same.

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  6. It sounds wonderful to me. It's good that you will have a separate house. I do so wish that my parent's house had an annexe of some description. I get on well with my parents, but with the best will in the world you get on one another's nerves at times. Especially as the 'invalid daughter'. I miss having my own (rented) home, even after two and a half years here, or perhaps especially after that!
    Just having your own front door is a wonderful thing. I have a room which is both bedroom and sitting room, and my own shower room, but even so, it's not the same.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hey, there's an Award over on my blog for you, and a hug x

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hey, there's an Award over on my blog for you, and a hug x

    ReplyDelete