Saturday, 1 December 2007

mostly


Today, I will mostly be stating (unintentionally) loudly in a cafe in Welshpool that Father Christmas does not exist and I will have no truck with colluding in the great seasonal 'lying to children' debacle. And subsequently creating a tumble-weed moment when everyone else within earshot with children in their party tried to wither me with their gaze.

Apart from that, things are fine.

Things calm down a bit for us after this weekend; B has just left for an overnight job in Birmingham and after that shouldn't be away again until the New Year. We are working on a plan for him to not have to work quite so hard away from home; we are both shattered and we have both discovered that we loathe him being away. Leo hates it too - he is very unsettled at the moment and clearly clingy with B when he is back. So we are hoping to change our lifestyle a bit to something more home-based. News as it develops, if it does.

It is eight o'clock, Leo is sleeping and I am going to bed, after seeing if I can find a hand-driven coffee-grinder on eBay.

9 comments:

  1. "Father Christmas does not exist" - WHAT?!

    *sobs*

    Sweet dreams, hon. While you can.

    ReplyDelete
  2. "Father Christmas does not exist" - WHAT?!

    *sobs*

    Sweet dreams, hon. While you can.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I have one you can have - it just needs a nut and a clean.

    ReplyDelete
  4. for the sake of father christmas, the tooth fairy, and the spaghetti monster are just fun, it's not really lying. Its not like encouraging like your telling your children to set their moral compass by these fictional pastimes, but that is a another delusion.

    Anyway, play the game a little more subtle. Children will discover for themselves the truth, and there is years of fun toying with these "innocent lies". Especially by priming your own children to drop timely little bombs to right into the middle of other childrens beliefs, and there helicopter uber parents!!!

    Watch the joy on your childs face as they get one up on the little spoilt brat.

    Not to mention the great conversations you have with their teachers in that church school you were forced to send them too because the local state school is frankly pants!

    ReplyDelete
  5. for the sake of father christmas, the tooth fairy, and the spaghetti monster are just fun, it's not really lying. Its not like encouraging like your telling your children to set their moral compass by these fictional pastimes, but that is a another delusion.

    Anyway, play the game a little more subtle. Children will discover for themselves the truth, and there is years of fun toying with these "innocent lies". Especially by priming your own children to drop timely little bombs to right into the middle of other childrens beliefs, and there helicopter uber parents!!!

    Watch the joy on your childs face as they get one up on the little spoilt brat.

    Not to mention the great conversations you have with their teachers in that church school you were forced to send them too because the local state school is frankly pants!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Yeah. I don't do lying to kids either. I have a big issue with lying in general, to be honest.

    I think it's more far-reaching than just making Christmas more "fun", an innocent little lie.

    Mostly because the Santa system is a meritocracy. If you're good, you'll get lots of presents - how do you explain to your kid why, when they've been a little angel for months, the spoilt bratty monster in their class (with rich parents) got more toys than they did? The poor kid thinks there's something wrong with them, that they're not "good", that they don't deserve rewards. Could well be setting them up for therapy later.

    Oh and hi by the way, I've been lurking for a while and finally commented. :)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Yeah. I don't do lying to kids either. I have a big issue with lying in general, to be honest.

    I think it's more far-reaching than just making Christmas more "fun", an innocent little lie.

    Mostly because the Santa system is a meritocracy. If you're good, you'll get lots of presents - how do you explain to your kid why, when they've been a little angel for months, the spoilt bratty monster in their class (with rich parents) got more toys than they did? The poor kid thinks there's something wrong with them, that they're not "good", that they don't deserve rewards. Could well be setting them up for therapy later.

    Oh and hi by the way, I've been lurking for a while and finally commented. :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. *passes Steg a tissue*

    She Weevil - thank you very much! Have you given up? :)

    Jackylhunter - I don't agree with you - lying is lying is lying; but perhaps we can talk about this over alcohol over the weekend? :).

    Anna - hello and welcome! The meritocracy thing is something that hadn't occurred to me - we've been kicking this around a lot since you commented.

    ReplyDelete
  9. *passes Steg a tissue*

    She Weevil - thank you very much! Have you given up? :)

    Jackylhunter - I don't agree with you - lying is lying is lying; but perhaps we can talk about this over alcohol over the weekend? :).

    Anna - hello and welcome! The meritocracy thing is something that hadn't occurred to me - we've been kicking this around a lot since you commented.

    ReplyDelete