Tuesday, 10 July 2007

allium sativum

garlic
We have garlic.

See our garlic.

It is a mixture of Elephant Garlic, Purple Wight and Early Purple Wight.

You should plant your garlic on the shortest day of the year and harvest it on the longest - as a rule of thumb, this worked well, as did growing it in big-ass pots - deep ones, with plenty of room for the roots to go down. We got as good a result from the pot-reared stuff as we did from the ones that had been in the ground. It grows REALLY easily, I would recommend it as a high achievement crop for someone who was a bit nervy about growing their own veg - and who liked garlic, of course :).

It's now sitting in the kitchen waiting to be plaited and will keep at least until Christmas, probably much longer - depending on the humidity of where we keep it. We live in Wales, hence, quite high humidity, currently anyway.

We will keep some to plant in December, so hopefully next year our Garlic Costs will be a big, fat, zero. This lot came from The Garlic Farm on the Isle of Wight, with a comprehensive leaflet of Garlic Instructions. They have a great site that not only allows you to purchase online, but also contains all the garlic information that man, woman or garlic fan could possibly wot of.*

And now, here is an Anglo-Saxon Riddle:

I am a wondrous creature: to women a thing of joyful expectation, to close-lying companions serviceable. I harm no city-dweller excepting my slayer alone. My stem is erect and tall--I stand up in bed--and whiskery somewhere down below. Sometimes a countryman's quite comely daughter will venture, bumptious girl, to get a grip on me. She assaults my red self and seizes my head and clenches me in a cramped place. She will soon feel the effect of her encounter with me, this curl-locked woman who squeezes me. Her eye will be wet.

A small prize for the first person to guess the answer, on your honour not to use google ... . I should mention that the Anglo-Saxons liked a good double-entendre and there are about a million rude-seeming riddles floating around that are actually not that rude at all. This comes from a manuscript called 'The Exeter Book', written down by the monks at Exeter Cathedral. I think some time in the 9th Century - but I am not sure of the date and I'm happy to be corrected. KW, might this be your area?


* This is Old English. I am not entirely sure what it means - 'knows' I think - but it does sound good.

13 comments:

  1. Garlic? Aaaargh!

    *draws back in horror. casts cloak across face. exit through window stage left dressed suddenly as bat*

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  2. Garlic? Aaaargh!

    *draws back in horror. casts cloak across face. exit through window stage left dressed suddenly as bat*

    ReplyDelete
  3. That's a lot of garlic! It would take me about a week to get through that lot. Yes, we like a little garlic.

    Is it radish that the comely daughter can't keep her hands off.

    ReplyDelete
  4. That's a lot of garlic! It would take me about a week to get through that lot. Yes, we like a little garlic.

    Is it radish that the comely daughter can't keep her hands off.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Is it a red onion? Though why women should have joyful expectation of it confuses me.

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  6. I'm with Z - an onion. I mean you were in the allium family anyhows and onions are the only veg I know to make your eyes water.
    Could be a regular old english onion, tho, with a red (purplish) flowering head?

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  7. I'm with Z - an onion. I mean you were in the allium family anyhows and onions are the only veg I know to make your eyes water.
    Could be a regular old english onion, tho, with a red (purplish) flowering head?

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  8. Oooh ooooh me me me me! I know! I know! I translated the Exeter Book as part of my first degree!

    Actually, come to think of it, I'll shut up now as that's not really fair, is it? And bearing in mind that during a translation of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, I succeeded in misplacing half a dozen Viking ships, I'm possibly not best-placed to comment...

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  9. Oooh ooooh me me me me! I know! I know! I translated the Exeter Book as part of my first degree!

    Actually, come to think of it, I'll shut up now as that's not really fair, is it? And bearing in mind that during a translation of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, I succeeded in misplacing half a dozen Viking ships, I'm possibly not best-placed to comment...

    ReplyDelete
  10. "It grows REALLY easily, I would recommend it as a high achievement crop for someone who was a bit nervy about growing their own veg - and who liked garlic, of course :)."

    Second I get an allotment or a garden, it's going in. Free garlic bread all around!*

    Oh and I was going to say onion, but I'll go for carrot instead. And a woman doing unmentionables to it.

    * Provide your own bread.

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  11. "It grows REALLY easily, I would recommend it as a high achievement crop for someone who was a bit nervy about growing their own veg - and who liked garlic, of course :)."

    Second I get an allotment or a garden, it's going in. Free garlic bread all around!*

    Oh and I was going to say onion, but I'll go for carrot instead. And a woman doing unmentionables to it.

    * Provide your own bread.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I have a real stupid guess... but hey this is for fun anyway. I'm thinking the answer is a cow's teat.

    It's the country girl/squirting in eye thing that made me think of that.

    K.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I have a real stupid guess... but hey this is for fun anyway. I'm thinking the answer is a cow's teat.

    It's the country girl/squirting in eye thing that made me think of that.

    K.

    ReplyDelete