Tuesday, 29 May 2007

food

Sorry, more pregnancy stuff - but, presumably spurred on by the government's announcement this week about not drinking at all during pregnancy, there's a brilliant article by Zoe Williams in The Guardian this morning about the rubbish people (including alleged professionals) tell you about your diet whilst you are pregnant.

This is a bug-bear of mine and I pretty much agree with it word for word. I've been resolutely eating soft cheese, drinking tea and partaking of the occasional glass of wine; and I certainly don't intend to stop because the Nanny State thinks that I've suddenly lost my cognitive facilities and my ability to make decisions based on accurate evidence just because I've got knocked up.

Thank you everyone for the nappy input - I am watching some eBay auctions, but I'm also going to have a look on the Powys County Council website and see if there are any grants towards re-usuables (thank you Z!).

I'm going to have my breakfast now. Nothing like a good rant to get you going in the morning.

20 comments:

  1. It's an excellent article, thanks for the link.

    What is rarely mentioned, and would be helpful, is the effect of what you eat and drink while breastfeeding. Dilly found that drinking orange juice herself gave her daughter bad colic.

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  2. It's an excellent article, thanks for the link.

    What is rarely mentioned, and would be helpful, is the effect of what you eat and drink while breastfeeding. Dilly found that drinking orange juice herself gave her daughter bad colic.

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  3. My mum drank a lot during my pregnancy, and it never affected me.

    **hits head on desk**

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  4. My mum drank a lot during my pregnancy, and it never affected me.

    **hits head on desk**

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  5. would not only do no harm but would help Mom relax. SHe called it her "baby Heiniken"You have to wonder son't you. My mom ate and drank whatever, and smoked as well. had healthy kids. I knew alcohol and cigarettes were taboo, but drank coffe by the gallon. Had healthy kids. Today, expectant Mom's won't touch caffine either. A friend you just had a baby was told by her Dr. that 10 ounces of beer a day

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  6. would not only do no harm but would help Mom relax. SHe called it her "baby Heiniken"You have to wonder son't you. My mom ate and drank whatever, and smoked as well. had healthy kids. I knew alcohol and cigarettes were taboo, but drank coffe by the gallon. Had healthy kids. Today, expectant Mom's won't touch caffine either. A friend you just had a baby was told by her Dr. that 10 ounces of beer a day

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  7. It's not only whilst you're pregnant. People talk a lot of twaddle when you have babies and children as well.

    For example, someone went bonkers once because my 2-year-old asked for a glass of milk, and the only milk in the house we were visiting was semi-skimmed. The advice says "Do not feed skimmed or semi skimmed milk to children" (because some dimwit thought that an ultra-low-fat-diet was "healthier", and the kid ended up short on fat-soluble vitamins and got rickets, or perhaps beri-beri, I'm not au-fait with these dickensian deficiency illnesses). It doesn't mean that feeding a single glass of semi-skimmed milk to a toddler will cause the child to become deathly ill. But could I make this point? No way - the person in question went berserk and even reported me to my health visitor for "feeding my child semi-skimmed milk" Gasp! And in response the health visitor turned to me and said "You know, you're not supposed to give children semi-skimmed milk under the age of 6".

    I'm now serving a 5-10 year stretch for assaulting a health-visitor, which I think is unfair because the doctors were quite easily able to remove the height/weight chart from where I rammed it.

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  8. It's not only whilst you're pregnant. People talk a lot of twaddle when you have babies and children as well.

    For example, someone went bonkers once because my 2-year-old asked for a glass of milk, and the only milk in the house we were visiting was semi-skimmed. The advice says "Do not feed skimmed or semi skimmed milk to children" (because some dimwit thought that an ultra-low-fat-diet was "healthier", and the kid ended up short on fat-soluble vitamins and got rickets, or perhaps beri-beri, I'm not au-fait with these dickensian deficiency illnesses). It doesn't mean that feeding a single glass of semi-skimmed milk to a toddler will cause the child to become deathly ill. But could I make this point? No way - the person in question went berserk and even reported me to my health visitor for "feeding my child semi-skimmed milk" Gasp! And in response the health visitor turned to me and said "You know, you're not supposed to give children semi-skimmed milk under the age of 6".

    I'm now serving a 5-10 year stretch for assaulting a health-visitor, which I think is unfair because the doctors were quite easily able to remove the height/weight chart from where I rammed it.

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  9. My father ran a winery, and he was always appalled at the dirty looks (and even indignant scoldings) people would give pregnant women if they had half a glass of wine. Certainly getting drunk is a horrible idea while you are pregnant, but a little bit of beer or wine occasionally (provided your body is used to it and can metabolize it easily) is fine and is nobody's business but your own.

    People really don't seem to be able to handle the idea that there are differences in *degree*--not everything is black and white.

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  10. My father ran a winery, and he was always appalled at the dirty looks (and even indignant scoldings) people would give pregnant women if they had half a glass of wine. Certainly getting drunk is a horrible idea while you are pregnant, but a little bit of beer or wine occasionally (provided your body is used to it and can metabolize it easily) is fine and is nobody's business but your own.

    People really don't seem to be able to handle the idea that there are differences in *degree*--not everything is black and white.

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  11. That article was wonderful. Except I don't understand what's wrong with not trusting the Danish, simply on principle.

    The one constant in pregnancy/baby advice, particularly from the professionals, is that it will change. When Thing One was born, you were supposed to somehow prop babies on their sides while sleeping. When Thing Two was born . . . I don't remember, I don't think I even listened. When Little Cat Z was born, you were supposed to always have them on their backs. This is especially fun when you have a precocious child who learns to roll over early, and prefers to sleep on her stomach.

    Cigarette smoking by pregnant women is supposed to automatically cause low birth weight (at least, the way people talk it is). My friend tried to quit when she was pregnant, but failed. Her son was 9 lbs, 15.9 oz. Imagine if she hadn't smoked, then!

    I think that there are far too many variables that affect babies (and mothers!) to say definitively that x-behavior will cause y-defect. I'm not suggesting that you should start smoking like a chimney, make gallons of rhubarb wine and drink it all at once, and mainline caffiene, because it won't make a bit of difference, but certainly some women are capable of making decisions for themselves, even when their hormones have gone berserk.

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  12. That article was wonderful. Except I don't understand what's wrong with not trusting the Danish, simply on principle.

    The one constant in pregnancy/baby advice, particularly from the professionals, is that it will change. When Thing One was born, you were supposed to somehow prop babies on their sides while sleeping. When Thing Two was born . . . I don't remember, I don't think I even listened. When Little Cat Z was born, you were supposed to always have them on their backs. This is especially fun when you have a precocious child who learns to roll over early, and prefers to sleep on her stomach.

    Cigarette smoking by pregnant women is supposed to automatically cause low birth weight (at least, the way people talk it is). My friend tried to quit when she was pregnant, but failed. Her son was 9 lbs, 15.9 oz. Imagine if she hadn't smoked, then!

    I think that there are far too many variables that affect babies (and mothers!) to say definitively that x-behavior will cause y-defect. I'm not suggesting that you should start smoking like a chimney, make gallons of rhubarb wine and drink it all at once, and mainline caffiene, because it won't make a bit of difference, but certainly some women are capable of making decisions for themselves, even when their hormones have gone berserk.

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  13. A little alcohol & coffee during pregnancy didn't hurt either one of my kids. The literature can be quite alarmist.

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  14. A little alcohol & coffee during pregnancy didn't hurt either one of my kids. The literature can be quite alarmist.

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  15. Pregnant women making decisions for themselves about what's acceptable during their pregnancy?? Whatever next?
    /sarcasm

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  16. Pregnant women making decisions for themselves about what's acceptable during their pregnancy?? Whatever next?
    /sarcasm

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  17. It does sometimes make me wonder about others perceptions of women's abilities to make a decision. Recently there was an article that all women of child bearing age should take folic acid "just in case". That doesn't eliminate any women if you read the news- 7 and 8 year old girls are starting their periods and a 60 year old woman just gave birth to twins. I agree that there should be more information about what you eat during breastfeeding, but also more info on post-partum depression. It seems that women hurting their children AFTER being born has made the news much more lately than those damaging them during pregancy.

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  18. It does sometimes make me wonder about others perceptions of women's abilities to make a decision. Recently there was an article that all women of child bearing age should take folic acid "just in case". That doesn't eliminate any women if you read the news- 7 and 8 year old girls are starting their periods and a 60 year old woman just gave birth to twins. I agree that there should be more information about what you eat during breastfeeding, but also more info on post-partum depression. It seems that women hurting their children AFTER being born has made the news much more lately than those damaging them during pregancy.

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  19. I hope your breakfast was a glass of vino collapso and a steak? Now you know what I meant about never leaving a serious comment ;)

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