Monday, 28 May 2007

don't be too rash

Could we briefly talk about nappies?

Not dramatic, humorous or intellectual, but in another sixteen weeks, essential.

We want to use re-usables. So I have visited The Nappy Lady, I have chatted with various friends (including Lisa, who I have decided is going to be my Nappy Guru *waves*) and we feel that we have gathered all the relevant information*.

We then moved on to researching purchasing outlets.

Did you know that a new set of birth-to-potty-training nappies can cost between £250 and £350?

Eeeep!

But if you contrast that with £5 to £10 a week until age three, then that's actually fine - it's just that it's an upfront cost rather than spread out.

However, we are looking at second hand ones, from eBay (there are still some listed for sale despite the fuss a few months back about them actually being 'used underwear' and therefore a 'fetish' product - what?!) and from various other second-hand outlets. So much choice - and only sixteen weeks to choose.

They come in white, 'natural' or coloured; with pictures; without pictures; with velcro; with even-better-than-velcro 'aplix'; with poppers; or with 'nappy nippers'. You can have all-in-ones; pocket-padded; fleecy liners; terry liners; muslin nappies; over-wraps with poppers, velcro or aplix; fleecy, fluffy or waterproof; small, medium or large.

My head is spinning.

I think I am going to take Lisa's advice, which was basically; make a decision, buy some, put them in the cupboard and feel smug at how organised we are. I think we will take this - it's very rare for anyone to advise one to be smug, so it seems a shame to waste the opportunity.

In other news, the house we like IS now going to sealed bids, on the 6th of June. I am less stressed about it than I thought I would be. B went to Vienna this morning and is back on Wednesday. To celebrate, I am washing the sheets in anticipation of his return.

And that, for today, is all. Tomorrow, baby-chick pictures.


* Including the fact that everyone involved with re-usable nappies seems to use the word 'containment' a lot, something I previously thought was only appropriate to nuclear reactors and chemical spillages. Please, do NOT tell me why this is appropriate language. Let me keep my innocence for another few weeks.

18 comments:

  1. I used a nappy nipper with my babies (well, actually a series of nappy nippers) and can exclusively reveal that they are a marvellous invention!

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  2. I concur; we used nappy nippas with LTB much preferable to pins which I had used with Arty Daughter. I used terry squares and motherease wraps on cost basically. I made a large fleece wrap for later on. I never had a containment problem and the only part of LTB's body that was unaffected by eczema was his nappy area!

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  3. I concur; we used nappy nippas with LTB much preferable to pins which I had used with Arty Daughter. I used terry squares and motherease wraps on cost basically. I made a large fleece wrap for later on. I never had a containment problem and the only part of LTB's body that was unaffected by eczema was his nappy area!

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  4. I don't know the name of the type my daughter-in-law uses, but they are padded cotton squares that you fold in three and tuck in rubber lined (cotton outside) pants that fasten with velcro, no pins or 'nippers' needed. I can ask her the type if you like. I'm sure she got a grant towards the cost. She uses a simple liner from a roll and says it's been little mess or trouble and has saved so much money and waste.

    Of course, the financial layout wasn't all in one go, she bought more as the baby grew and has reused them for the second baby. Children who wear proper nappies usually get out of them younger as they are more aware of the sensation of wetness.

    Good luck with the bid, it''ll be out of your hands so no need for stress.

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  5. I don't know the name of the type my daughter-in-law uses, but they are padded cotton squares that you fold in three and tuck in rubber lined (cotton outside) pants that fasten with velcro, no pins or 'nippers' needed. I can ask her the type if you like. I'm sure she got a grant towards the cost. She uses a simple liner from a roll and says it's been little mess or trouble and has saved so much money and waste.

    Of course, the financial layout wasn't all in one go, she bought more as the baby grew and has reused them for the second baby. Children who wear proper nappies usually get out of them younger as they are more aware of the sensation of wetness.

    Good luck with the bid, it''ll be out of your hands so no need for stress.

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  6. "nuclear reactors and chemical spillages" - *grins evilly*

    Can I recommend Sudocrem in case Baby's bum gets sore. Superb stuff!

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  7. "nuclear reactors and chemical spillages" - *grins evilly*

    Can I recommend Sudocrem in case Baby's bum gets sore. Superb stuff!

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  8. ...oh and fingers crossed for your "sealed bid"!

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  9. ...oh and fingers crossed for your "sealed bid"!

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  10. We've been using cloth with Little Cat Z. We have many prefolds, one fitted that I made from this pattern, http://www.fernandfaerie.com/sewing_fitteds.html (although I didn't bother with the hook and loop tape), and several covers. We stopped using pins a few months ago, trusting (with much hand-wringing at first) the covers to keep the diapers in place.

    It does cost a lot up front, but you can spread it out over time. I don't think you need to go crazy (like some of these women do . . . hand-embroidered diapers often get bid up over $200 on Ebay), though. I'm sure we've spent less than $300, and the Little Cat will be two next month. That doesn't include detergent and the water and electricity to run the washer, but I'm still certain we're spending far less than we would with disposables.

    Cloth diapers are no more difficult to handle than disposables, particularly if you have your own washer and dryer. I can understand some people not wanting to use them, but if you're willing, you'll save a bundle, which you can then spend on cute baby clothes.:-)

    I have encountered one problem with them. Disposables are much more trim, and premade clothes are made with disposables in mind. Sometimes, particularly if Little Cat Z is in an extra-absorbant mix, her pants don't quite cover the, um, cover. It's not a big problem, though, just something to keep in mind.

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  11. We've been using cloth with Little Cat Z. We have many prefolds, one fitted that I made from this pattern, http://www.fernandfaerie.com/sewing_fitteds.html (although I didn't bother with the hook and loop tape), and several covers. We stopped using pins a few months ago, trusting (with much hand-wringing at first) the covers to keep the diapers in place.

    It does cost a lot up front, but you can spread it out over time. I don't think you need to go crazy (like some of these women do . . . hand-embroidered diapers often get bid up over $200 on Ebay), though. I'm sure we've spent less than $300, and the Little Cat will be two next month. That doesn't include detergent and the water and electricity to run the washer, but I'm still certain we're spending far less than we would with disposables.

    Cloth diapers are no more difficult to handle than disposables, particularly if you have your own washer and dryer. I can understand some people not wanting to use them, but if you're willing, you'll save a bundle, which you can then spend on cute baby clothes.:-)

    I have encountered one problem with them. Disposables are much more trim, and premade clothes are made with disposables in mind. Sometimes, particularly if Little Cat Z is in an extra-absorbant mix, her pants don't quite cover the, um, cover. It's not a big problem, though, just something to keep in mind.

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  12. Bambino Mio are the ones I was talking about. And there was a £30 grant from the County Council, but I don't know how many councils give that, and of course it would only be for new ones.

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  13. Bambino Mio are the ones I was talking about. And there was a £30 grant from the County Council, but I don't know how many councils give that, and of course it would only be for new ones.

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  14. Ooh! A guru? (preens proudly)

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  15. Nappy squares, from eBay, with pins and plastic pants - did for me thirty years ago, and now will do well for my new granddaughter.

    It is the cheapest and works.

    Good luck with the bid, also.
    cheers, kaz xx

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  16. Nappy squares, from eBay, with pins and plastic pants - did for me thirty years ago, and now will do well for my new granddaughter.

    It is the cheapest and works.

    Good luck with the bid, also.
    cheers, kaz xx

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  17. we have used Motherease since birth - and Milo is two now. They cost aroun £8 each, but are great - rarely have problems.

    Night time we use Moltex biodegradable disposables.

    We bought them from Treehuggermums.co.uk

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  18. we have used Motherease since birth - and Milo is two now. They cost aroun £8 each, but are great - rarely have problems.

    Night time we use Moltex biodegradable disposables.

    We bought them from Treehuggermums.co.uk

    ReplyDelete