Thursday, 29 March 2007

still knitting after all these years ...

Kate and Vic have just left - the bathroom is now white rather than yucky-pinky-terracotta (you never see that listed in paint charts, do you?), the office is pristine and empty of teetering piles of filing, and the chicken pen has a door that is attached with real, live hinges, rather than cobbled together with cable ties.

Kate took me to my obstretician appointment yesterday and it went very well. You have to have confidence in a gynaecologist who swears more than you do during an appointment and who understands lambing. She has given the ok for me to stay on the escitalopram, provided I don't need to increase the dosage, in which case they would probably put me on something different. But she confirmed that despite the drugs, the baby won't come out with fins.

Because of this show of competence on her part, I felt able to confide that sometimes, in the dark, insane reaches of the night, I have been worrying that some kind of Foetal Re-Absorption Miracle has taken place and I am no longer pregnant.

I do realise that this is extremely unlikely (or even, impossible) and did say so. However, she didn't laugh too much and got one of those loud speaker things in and we listened to the baby's heart-beat. So it's still there.

Which is nice.

Particularly since Kate is Still Knitting.

This is fine. Sweet, in fact.

However, she doesn't really believe in knitting tension squares before she starts.

So although we have a large number of baby clothes, there is not, perhaps, the consistency of size that one would, maybe, be looking for in ones knitted items.

I have not, so far, pointed out that I am not carrying twins with radically different limb lengths; which I do think by this point this might have been flagged up by a scan. However, unless some kind of Foetal Cloning Limb-Length Miracle takes place in the next six months, we are going to have a surplus of knitted cardies of various different shapes and sizes.

They are, I hasten to add, really, really lovely. It's just the sizing ... .

In other news, we have two broody pekin hens and I am about to set some eggs under them. Yay for chicks!

14 comments:

  1. Actually, I think a set of multi-sized items (wherein each item has parts all of the same size, mind you) is great. A baby grows so quickly, that if everything you get is newborn-size, then nothing will get much wear, *and* you'll find yourself having to shell out money for baby clothes sooner than you need to!

    Now, my mother did, on a trip to Ireland, buy yarn to make 2-year-old Impera a cabled sweater. She got home and started on it. Then, things got busy. She finally finished the swetaer last year, and figured that, golly, considering Impera was now *11*, she'd probably give it to one of the younger grandchildren.

    Except that it was so big, it fit my then-9-year-old. So we did end up getting it after all!

    Yeah, gauge swatches have their uses!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Actually, I think a set of multi-sized items (wherein each item has parts all of the same size, mind you) is great. A baby grows so quickly, that if everything you get is newborn-size, then nothing will get much wear, *and* you'll find yourself having to shell out money for baby clothes sooner than you need to!

    Now, my mother did, on a trip to Ireland, buy yarn to make 2-year-old Impera a cabled sweater. She got home and started on it. Then, things got busy. She finally finished the swetaer last year, and figured that, golly, considering Impera was now *11*, she'd probably give it to one of the younger grandchildren.

    Except that it was so big, it fit my then-9-year-old. So we did end up getting it after all!

    Yeah, gauge swatches have their uses!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Eeek! I know about the foetal reabsorption feeling, I got that in my first pregnancy. Until things started happening I was quite sure I just wasn't pregnant any more. But you know, you've got the being sick thing to keep you comforted so...

    ReplyDelete
  4. Eeek! I know about the foetal reabsorption feeling, I got that in my first pregnancy. Until things started happening I was quite sure I just wasn't pregnant any more. But you know, you've got the being sick thing to keep you comforted so...

    ReplyDelete
  5. So good to hear your healthcare professionals are keeping you reassured. It's reassuring that you're reassured, in fact.
    I've often thought that knitting is therapeutic in and of itself. The fact that "knitting" (noun) is created by "knitting" (verb) is almost wholly coincidental.
    And Imperatrix is right (as usual) about covering all bases when it comes to sizes. I'm sure Kate wouldn't be offended if any that don't fit baby were put to "other uses".

    ReplyDelete
  6. So good to hear your healthcare professionals are keeping you reassured. It's reassuring that you're reassured, in fact.
    I've often thought that knitting is therapeutic in and of itself. The fact that "knitting" (noun) is created by "knitting" (verb) is almost wholly coincidental.
    And Imperatrix is right (as usual) about covering all bases when it comes to sizes. I'm sure Kate wouldn't be offended if any that don't fit baby were put to "other uses".

    ReplyDelete
  7. You are not nuts, just filled with normal, irrational, hormonal and maternal defensiveness of sprog.

    As to the knitting - cheer up - baby clothes get burped all over etc all the time, spend most of their working life in the wash and then become too small so fast, plus if theres a girl, larger dollies are always grateful for hand-me downs and don't ever mind having to roll up just one sleeve....

    :-)

    ReplyDelete
  8. You are not nuts, just filled with normal, irrational, hormonal and maternal defensiveness of sprog.

    As to the knitting - cheer up - baby clothes get burped all over etc all the time, spend most of their working life in the wash and then become too small so fast, plus if theres a girl, larger dollies are always grateful for hand-me downs and don't ever mind having to roll up just one sleeve....

    :-)

    ReplyDelete
  9. d'you know, I had a similar feeling with my second baby. The GP didn't think it was worth taking a pregnancy test as I'd already had one baby, and this was in the days before scans (30 years ago) so I worried for several months that I wasn't pregnant at all, and there was something awful wrong with me.

    Glad to say my daughter was born all pink, ugly and perfectly healthy.

    Is the knitting in various colours as well as, well, variously shaped? I guffawed when I read that bit! kaz xx

    ReplyDelete
  10. d'you know, I had a similar feeling with my second baby. The GP didn't think it was worth taking a pregnancy test as I'd already had one baby, and this was in the days before scans (30 years ago) so I worried for several months that I wasn't pregnant at all, and there was something awful wrong with me.

    Glad to say my daughter was born all pink, ugly and perfectly healthy.

    Is the knitting in various colours as well as, well, variously shaped? I guffawed when I read that bit! kaz xx

    ReplyDelete
  11. 'larger dollies are always grateful for hand-me downs and don't ever mind having to roll up just one sleeve....'

    sorry until i re-read this i had some horrible trainspotting-heroin-dolly vision

    oh and

    yay for chicks...

    ReplyDelete
  12. 'larger dollies are always grateful for hand-me downs and don't ever mind having to roll up just one sleeve....'

    sorry until i re-read this i had some horrible trainspotting-heroin-dolly vision

    oh and

    yay for chicks...

    ReplyDelete
  13. Yay!

    *passes suitably non-alcholic beverage*

    Here's to non-yucky bathrooms. And non-foetal reabsorption. And nice healthcare people, like wot Steg said. :)

    ReplyDelete
  14. Yay!

    *passes suitably non-alcholic beverage*

    Here's to non-yucky bathrooms. And non-foetal reabsorption. And nice healthcare people, like wot Steg said. :)

    ReplyDelete