Friday, 17 November 2006

behaviour managment, rayburns and thermal underwear

We've got an adoption meeting this morning - today we are covering 'Dealing with our feelings about abuse', 'Behaviour management', and 'Difference'.

Yesterday we spent all morning trying to sort out all the bits of B's International CRB checks that he has to apply for in person. This has involved writing to France, Germany, Canada and the USA, enclosing payment of about a tenner a time. For the latter two, he also has to go to our local police station and get his fingerprints taken. He's going to do that on Monday, along with getting a notarised copy of his passport sorted out to send to Germany.

It's all been rather frustrating.

And I am grumpy because the client who I spent last week busting my ass on behalf of, trying to sort out their crewing issues, has now phoned back and cancelled about half of the crew they'd booked. I had already sorted people out for them for those days and now I've had to un-sort. Obviously changes happen and clients do need to cancel stuff; but it's very frustrating when you know that it's happening because of bad planning on their part rather than thing outside of their control. *grumble grumble grumble*.

However, my thermal underwear (Marks and Spencer) and two polo-neck sweaters (eBay) have arrived, so that's a LARGE tick in the positive box. Do you KNOW how prohibititively expensive Damart thermals are these days? And could someone please explain to me why women's thermal underwear is mostly all lacy and with low-cut necks that expose your chest to the cold, rather than up to your chin and down below your bottom to keep out the drafts? I have actually bought M&S men's vests, as the women's range was so impractical. However, so far, I have drawn the line at combinations.

rayburnOh, and Mitey Mite - a Rayburn is a solid-fuel range cooker that can also heat your water and run your central heating. It's got a hotplate on the top and an oven on the right in this particular model. Apparently if you run it on low and leave the bottom door open, it also makes a good sleeping-place for cats ... .

We are planning on installing it the kitchen and keeping it running for the autumn/winter/spring, to keep that end of the house warm and cosy. At the moment it's quite damp, which we think is because the walls are stone and about eighteen inches thick and there's no damp course.

We are also having issues working out the correct temperature to keep the central heating thermostat - again because of the thick walls I think, although the oil-fired central heating seems very effective in heating the radiators - however it seems to take quite a while to heat up and then a while to cool down again. And because the house is quite long and thin it's not the most efficient shape for heat retention.

So far we've found that the best option seems to be to keep the heating on at about 14 degrees centigrade all the time - the thick walls then retain the heat and after a couple of days the boiler is barely working at all. It's really just a case of working out the best way to handle it. But an always-on heat source in the kitchen should really help.

I will now remove my heating-geek hat and go and take B a cup of tea - he got in at about 4am from a get-out in Liverpool (we stayed at his parents last night) and now we need to be compos-mentis for 11am for the adoption worker.

10 comments:

  1. good luck with the adoption meeting

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  2. Have you thought about those thermostats that change the temperature they're aiming for depending on the time of day? You can work out how long it takes for the house to warm up and cool down and then adjust the times and temperatures accordingly. I've even considered getting another one and dividing the house into zones with an electrical valve because the top part obviously doesn't usually need to be as hot as the bottom part. And then of course there's TRVs which should switch off the radiators when the room's hot enough, but of course you don't need your living room to be as hot during the night as during the day. In fact, how about getting an old computer and a bunch of sensors and then you could... OK OK I'll come quietly, no need for the straitjacket

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  3. Have you thought about those thermostats that change the temperature they're aiming for depending on the time of day? You can work out how long it takes for the house to warm up and cool down and then adjust the times and temperatures accordingly. I've even considered getting another one and dividing the house into zones with an electrical valve because the top part obviously doesn't usually need to be as hot as the bottom part. And then of course there's TRVs which should switch off the radiators when the room's hot enough, but of course you don't need your living room to be as hot during the night as during the day. In fact, how about getting an old computer and a bunch of sensors and then you could... OK OK I'll come quietly, no need for the straitjacket

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  4. Hope all goes well.
    Fingers crossed for you both.

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  5. Hope all goes well.
    Fingers crossed for you both.

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  6. Hope the meeting went well!

    Not sure about the heating issue, we have had our system for six years and it still mystifies me.

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  7. Hope the meeting went well!

    Not sure about the heating issue, we have had our system for six years and it still mystifies me.

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  8. The Rayburn should really help. We haven't needed to switch on any other heating yet, as the Aga warms that end of the house nicely. I just light the sitting-room fire for the evening.

    The bottom oven is also splendid for warming wellies before putting them on, whilst you are warming socks, gloves and hands on the lid.

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  9. The Rayburn should really help. We haven't needed to switch on any other heating yet, as the Aga warms that end of the house nicely. I just light the sitting-room fire for the evening.

    The bottom oven is also splendid for warming wellies before putting them on, whilst you are warming socks, gloves and hands on the lid.

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  10. Now that I know what it is, I want one! Probably impractical for Texas, though, unless I could find a model that also cools.

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