Friday, 18 August 2006

beer, muck, recent graduates and day-old-chicks

Urgh.

Right. Where was I?

We have spent another couple of days at Ma's:

  • Polytunnels erected - 1
  • Father's hair cut with new clipper zzzzzy things - 1
  • Dogs with holes in (although getting smaller) - 1
  • Bantams roosting on back of Stanna Stairlift - 1
  • Bags of muck and/or topsoil brought back - 0 (It was raining REALLY hard this morning and I couldn't face digging it out and then driving for four hours soaked to the skin.  I know, I am not a *real* country person.  The smell was a factor, too.)
And now we are home.  We came back past the Wernlas Collection and picked up sixteen day old chicks and a dozen eggs for the incubator.

Yay! for day-old chicks!

They are happily settled in the corner of the study under a heat-lamp we've borrowed from Ma. The cats are fascinated; but luckily the room has a lockable door, so I am hoping that their intrinsic lack of opposable thumbs will mean that they can't get in and effect Chick Slaughter, which is clearly their master plan.  Luckily we have no air-conditioning ducts for them to crawl through cat-commando style in their little cat-sized Mission Impossible harnesses to gain access.

I have come back to a slightly bolshy email from someone we have offered a job to for three months in the autumn.  The tone of it has made me a bit disgruntled.  He's a really nice guy and a competent technician;  but he doesn't seem to have much grip on real-world economics.  Rather than saying 'thanks for the offer, but it's not really what I'm looking for', he seems to have taken offence. This is because we have offered him a monthly salary at significantly less than the per-day rate that we charge crew out at;  and the rate he could potentially (very potentially, if he was lucky, given his lack of client-handling skills, his lack of experience and his lack of contacts) command as a freelancer.

Am I alone in being a bit bewildered about the career expectations of recent graduates?  Do they all expect to walk in to highly paid posts with very little experience or maturity?  Does no-one explain to them at college about the running costs of companies?  Overheads like tax, employers NI, insurance, safety wear?  And the actual 'making a profit' point of being in business at all?

Does no-one point out to them that by joining a company, you are cloaked with the reputation of that company from the word go, rather than having to go out and tout for business with each new client, and prove yourself over and over again as a freelancer?  That the company you join guarantees your salary, whether or not you are out bringing money in or sitting on your hands in the office?

Hence 'urgh'.

Answers on a post-card or in the comments box, please.

I am going to have another glass of wine and see whether B can be persuaded to give me a back-massage.  Excuse me.

Oh.  Tomorrow.  Report on the beer recipe!  Maybe.  Soon, anyway.

Ooooh, and Joules, thank you VERY much for the tomato chutney recipe ... I will let you know how I get on ...  .

17 comments:

  1. You expect recent graduates to have any grasp on "real world economics"? Ooh, you foolish, naive thing you! They figure once they've got their degree then they're doing you a favour by letting you employ them until a better offer comes along. Tell him to sling his hook!

    And keep an eye on those cats, devious things that they are!

    *waits patiently for news of beer*

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  2. You expect recent graduates to have any grasp on "real world economics"? Ooh, you foolish, naive thing you! They figure once they've got their degree then they're doing you a favour by letting you employ them until a better offer comes along. Tell him to sling his hook!

    And keep an eye on those cats, devious things that they are!

    *waits patiently for news of beer*

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  3. Chicks and incubators sounds good.

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  4. You're very welcome - and good luck with the chicks!

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  5. You're very welcome - and good luck with the chicks!

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  6. I love your style of prose! I just have to say it occasionally :-)

    It is almost like an episode from The Good Life ;-)

    Good luck with chicks, cats, graduates and beer.

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  7. I love your style of prose! I just have to say it occasionally :-)

    It is almost like an episode from The Good Life ;-)

    Good luck with chicks, cats, graduates and beer.

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  8. It still seems to me that graduates are told to expect all things fantastic when they finish their degrees, and sadly, a lot of them believe it. Cue 'but I've got a degreeeeee!' Oh please. And...?

    Glad the weekend went well; chick pics, please! :)

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  9. It still seems to me that graduates are told to expect all things fantastic when they finish their degrees, and sadly, a lot of them believe it. Cue 'but I've got a degreeeeee!' Oh please. And...?

    Glad the weekend went well; chick pics, please! :)

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  10. I've got a degree. Can I have a highly paid job please? (About 4 hours a week would be perfect. Ta.)

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  11. I've got a degree. Can I have a highly paid job please? (About 4 hours a week would be perfect. Ta.)

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  12. Recent grads seem to expect the sun, the moon, the stars--and their Mom's cooking--that part amazes me

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  13. Recent grads seem to expect the sun, the moon, the stars--and their Mom's cooking--that part amazes me

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  14. Sounds like you've been pretty busy. The chicks sound sweet. I can imagine the cats planning a commando mission - lol!

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  15. Sounds like you've been pretty busy. The chicks sound sweet. I can imagine the cats planning a commando mission - lol!

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  16. It might not be to do with being a graduate so much as just being young and inexperienced. When I first started got paid to do theatre music I acted like a bit of an icehole when someone offered me a job and they didn't have much budget. I think it takes a while to understand the complex relationship between work, money, predictability and satisfaction.

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  17. It might not be to do with being a graduate so much as just being young and inexperienced. When I first started got paid to do theatre music I acted like a bit of an icehole when someone offered me a job and they didn't have much budget. I think it takes a while to understand the complex relationship between work, money, predictability and satisfaction.

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