Thursday, 20 July 2006

apricot wine and 'experimental chutney type #1'

This will make five gallons of apricot wine and about fifteen pounds of chutney (UK measurements)

  1. Buy three kilos of organic dried apricots at an extortionate price, justifying it to yourself that the thirty bottles of wine they will make will more than pay for them
  2. Place apricots in pan with two gallons of cold water and soak overnight
  3. Bring to boil, simmer for five or so minutes
  4. Allow to cool a bit, then strain the juice in to your five gallon, food-grade, bucket
  5. Add another two gallons of water, stir about a bit, then repeat boiling/simmering/straining bit
  6. Absentmindedly reserve solids in jam pan
  7. Top the juice up to five gallons, add six kilos of sugar, wait for it to cool and add depectiniser and ten teaspoons of citric acid
  8. Leave twenty-four hours for depectiniser to work, then add yeast and yeast nutrient to start wine off
  9. Go to the pub for three hours and drink enough cider to slightly impair your judgement on a hot afternoon
  10. On returning home, decide that you cannot bear to throw out such expensive apricots
  11. Decide to make chutney from them
  12. Add to jam pan, half a kilo of currants, three or four chopped onions and a few tablespoons of whatever spices take your fancy. I think we used chilli and coriander, but it is fair to say that I am not entirely sure
  13. Chuck in a bit of water and simmer for a couple of hours until it's going sludgy
  14. Add a bottle of nice vinegar, to just cover your sludge (NOT malt - we used 750ml of cider vinegar, but white wine would also do it. Apparently malt makes it yakky) and half a pound of sugar
  15. Simmer until it is the consitency of chutney - you'll have to start stirring it at some point, because it'll stick otherwise
  16. Look for jars
  17. Remember you threw most of the jars away before you moved
  18. Clean and heat the five jars you can find and put the chutney in them - screw caps are the way to go, but if they are metal, make sure they have been coated, because otherwise the vinegar does Bad Things to them and they do Bad Things to the chutney in return
  19. Shove chutney in jars and leave for three months
  20. Shove rest of chutney in freezer, with intent to reboil and pot when have collected jam jars
Somewhat surprisingly, it tastes rather nice.

15 comments:

  1. Corr, yeah! I *heart* chutneys!

    But what wuld I do with 15lbs of the stuff?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Corr, yeah! I *heart* chutneys!

    But what wuld I do with 15lbs of the stuff?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yup, definitely a Chutney of Distinction. Or should that be 'Distillation'? ;)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Yup, definitely a Chutney of Distinction. Or should that be 'Distillation'? ;)

    ReplyDelete
  5. You could always give some to me for Christmas every f-ing year until my fridge is so full of the stuff that there's no room for food and I starve to death.

    Sorry. Bad mood compounded by reading back issues of Bugs and Drugs.

    ReplyDelete
  6. You could always give some to me for Christmas every f-ing year until my fridge is so full of the stuff that there's no room for food and I starve to death.

    Sorry. Bad mood compounded by reading back issues of Bugs and Drugs.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hmmm sounds wonderful. we are lucky in that we can buy fresh apricots from the producer at around a fiver for 10 kilos! yummy. Are you having a party when the wine is ready?
    Beautiful views as well. You made the right decision to move.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hmmm sounds wonderful. we are lucky in that we can buy fresh apricots from the producer at around a fiver for 10 kilos! yummy. Are you having a party when the wine is ready?
    Beautiful views as well. You made the right decision to move.

    ReplyDelete
  9. My love of chutneys never quite conveys to my ability to consume them. I've got various vintages piled up at the back of cupboards.

    Like the wine recipe though. I've never tried making things alcholic, tho my mum was (still is for that matter) a vintner of distinction. I still have one bottle of dandelion wine that was just ace.

    ReplyDelete
  10. My love of chutneys never quite conveys to my ability to consume them. I've got various vintages piled up at the back of cupboards.

    Like the wine recipe though. I've never tried making things alcholic, tho my mum was (still is for that matter) a vintner of distinction. I still have one bottle of dandelion wine that was just ace.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I like your style of cooking, have you thought about doing TV?

    ReplyDelete
  12. ditdotdat - I will post you some, so that you can take your bad mood out on it :). Bugs and Drugs?

    ReplyDelete
  13. It's not that I don't like chutney, but I probably get through it at a rate of about 1 sandwich a month. Certain members of my family seem to be under the impression that I eat a great dollop with every meal. I just counted and I own 7 jars of chutneys, pickles and relishes, two of which I will use. Why don't I chuck the rest away immediately? Who knows.

    I discovered, on Googling, that Bugs & Drugs was a bit more obscure than I realised. It was a kind of skate punk zine, hard to describe. I'll tell you what, if you don't send me some chutney I'll lend you a back issue.

    ReplyDelete
  14. It's not that I don't like chutney, but I probably get through it at a rate of about 1 sandwich a month. Certain members of my family seem to be under the impression that I eat a great dollop with every meal. I just counted and I own 7 jars of chutneys, pickles and relishes, two of which I will use. Why don't I chuck the rest away immediately? Who knows.

    I discovered, on Googling, that Bugs & Drugs was a bit more obscure than I realised. It was a kind of skate punk zine, hard to describe. I'll tell you what, if you don't send me some chutney I'll lend you a back issue.

    ReplyDelete
  15. That sounds like a deal :).

    ReplyDelete