Thursday, 11 May 2006

ring o'ring o'roses


I am still wrestling with the PAYE submissions.  Apparently I have to do a 'manual amendment', which seems to be relatively straightforward.  Provided one has the right information.

Since I have no idea where the information that I need to submit actually is on my stack of printouts, it's taking me rather longer that I suspect it should.

If you know me via work you are probably never going to employ us again :(.

We took the two grown-up cats to the vet this morning for their annual injections.  Three Legs was fine.  Simpkin took one look at me when I called him in and bolted for the top of the shed.

So after we brought Three Legs back, we collected him up, using the treacherous 'feeding time' method and took him separately.

Apparently he has ringworm.  The vet is keeping him in for a couple of hours to investigate by shining an ultraviolet lamp on him.

Suddenly both B and I feel all itchy.

More later when I have emptied the numbers out of my head.



14 comments:

  1. Oh no, poor Simpkin, I hope he'll be ok. What does the ultraviolet light do?

    Good luck with the PAYE

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  2. Oh no, poor Simpkin, I hope he'll be ok. What does the ultraviolet light do?

    Good luck with the PAYE

    ReplyDelete
  3. Ugh! Ugh! Parasites. I only have to think about them and I'm itchy for days. Hope Simpkin is OK and hasn't passed the joy around.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Ugh! Ugh! Parasites. I only have to think about them and I'm itchy for days. Hope Simpkin is OK and hasn't passed the joy around.

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  5. "The ultraviolet Wood's lamp can be used to examine cats suspected of having ringworm. It is shone onto the haircoat in a dark room and infected hairs may fluoresce with a characteristic apple-green colour. The fluorescence is thought to be due to a metabolite produced by M canis . Unfortunately, not all dermatophyte species, or varieties of M canis , fluoresce, so failure to demonstrate fluorescent hairs does not rule out the possibility of ringworm. In addition, extraneous substances may cause a similar fluorescence. For these reasons the results of Wood's lamp examination is not definitive, but it can provide a very useful method of selecting hairs for further examination, either by fungal culture or microscopic examination. "

    All will be fine it's just athlete's foot of the cat. :{

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  6. "The ultraviolet Wood's lamp can be used to examine cats suspected of having ringworm. It is shone onto the haircoat in a dark room and infected hairs may fluoresce with a characteristic apple-green colour. The fluorescence is thought to be due to a metabolite produced by M canis . Unfortunately, not all dermatophyte species, or varieties of M canis , fluoresce, so failure to demonstrate fluorescent hairs does not rule out the possibility of ringworm. In addition, extraneous substances may cause a similar fluorescence. For these reasons the results of Wood's lamp examination is not definitive, but it can provide a very useful method of selecting hairs for further examination, either by fungal culture or microscopic examination. "

    All will be fine it's just athlete's foot of the cat. :{

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  7. [scratch scratch] :{.

    Bless him. I feel like a terrible mother, I thought he was just getting on a bit and his feet were stiff.

    He's got sunburned ears, as well :(.

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  8. [scratch scratch] :{.

    Bless him. I feel like a terrible mother, I thought he was just getting on a bit and his feet were stiff.

    He's got sunburned ears, as well :(.

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  9. Poor kitties. Sunburned ears? And speaking of itching. No worries, Mia has given us the gift of Texas fleas from which I am most definitely itching. *hangs head in shame* Husband, not so much. We are in a full on assault against the b@$!@rds. They are very crafty.

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  10. I'm sure he'll be just fine. Get him some nice treaty thing and all will be forgiven double-quick!

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  11. Poor kitties. Sunburned ears? And speaking of itching. No worries, Mia has given us the gift of Texas fleas from which I am most definitely itching. *hangs head in shame* Husband, not so much. We are in a full on assault against the b@$!@rds. They are very crafty.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I'm sure he'll be just fine. Get him some nice treaty thing and all will be forgiven double-quick!

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  13. Imagination is a terible thing. Our cat is, according to our vet, a "domestic short-hair", but the boy has a thick sable coat that we brush big handfuls of fur out of every day. In the summer, he is a haven for fleas, if we aren't careful (that is, if we are even a day late with the monthly poison flea treatments).

    I hate thinking of those darn fleas. Sorry about the ringworm!

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  14. Imagination is a terible thing. Our cat is, according to our vet, a "domestic short-hair", but the boy has a thick sable coat that we brush big handfuls of fur out of every day. In the summer, he is a haven for fleas, if we aren't careful (that is, if we are even a day late with the monthly poison flea treatments).

    I hate thinking of those darn fleas. Sorry about the ringworm!

    ReplyDelete