Wednesday, 24 November 2004

technical interlude

I have swapped browsers, to firefox and I can't recommend it enough.



It's quick, simple to use, secure and it blocks pop-ups. Yay!



technical interlude

I have swapped browsers, to firefox and I can't recommend it enough.



It's quick, simple to use, secure and it blocks pop-ups. Yay!



clone

R and I have concluded that we need to clone B.



We have had so much work recently that it seems like the only way forward. I have taken over diary keeping, since the incident where B booked himself a gig in Birmingham followed by a gig Belfast, which would only have been possible if he had used stepping disks to travel between the two locations.



We are now in the middle of the laborious process of training our clients to ring the office to check staff availablility before speaking to B about how to make the gig look pretty. We are still snowed with work though, which is brilliant. We are seriously considering taking on a fourth technician in the spring if it keeps up, so we can get some sleep.



clone

R and I have concluded that we need to clone B.



We have had so much work recently that it seems like the only way forward. I have taken over diary keeping, since the incident where B booked himself a gig in Birmingham followed by a gig Belfast, which would only have been possible if he had used stepping disks to travel between the two locations.



We are now in the middle of the laborious process of training our clients to ring the office to check staff availablility before speaking to B about how to make the gig look pretty. We are still snowed with work though, which is brilliant. We are seriously considering taking on a fourth technician in the spring if it keeps up, so we can get some sleep.



Wednesday, 17 November 2004

currently reading

I have been doing a lot of re-reading of 'comfort books' recently. Kind of like comfort eating, but it doesn't show on the hips. Over the last fortnight I have worked my way through:



The Eagle of the Ninth, The Silver Branch and The Lantern Bearers, all by Rosemary Sutcliff. Strictly speaking these are kids books. However, they are so well written that they are still a fantastic read twenty years after I was first caught by them. They are set in Roman Britain, spread out through the period. The attention to both historical detail and character detail makes them incredibly absorbing. The thread that seems to run through all her books that I have read is one of alienation and then reabsorption, either from/by society or by families ... usually children or young people. Sutcliff is also famous for 'Warrior Scarlet', which is still on my 'to do' list for this week.



The Natural History of Selborne by Gilbert White. An eighteenth century clergyman-naturalist's collected letters to fellow naturalists, observing the flora and fauna of his parish. Rather pretentiously, I always have this by the bed - I often find it soothing to read a few pages about the mating and migratory habits of swallows before I go to sleep.



Lined up next I have all the Dorothy L. Sayers 'Lord Peter Wimsey' mysteries, courtesy of Amazon. I've not read the early ones for a while and I am starting at the beginning of the series and working through in chronological order ... fun, but I am also experiencing elbow-tingling horror at some of the racist attitudes and class stereotyping that it was acceptable to include in popular fiction in the twenties.



currently reading

I have been doing a lot of re-reading of 'comfort books' recently. Kind of like comfort eating, but it doesn't show on the hips. Over the last fortnight I have worked my way through:



The Eagle of the Ninth, The Silver Branch and The Lantern Bearers, all by Rosemary Sutcliff. Strictly speaking these are kids books. However, they are so well written that they are still a fantastic read twenty years after I was first caught by them. They are set in Roman Britain, spread out through the period. The attention to both historical detail and character detail makes them incredibly absorbing. The thread that seems to run through all her books that I have read is one of alienation and then reabsorption, either from/by society or by families ... usually children or young people. Sutcliff is also famous for 'Warrior Scarlet', which is still on my 'to do' list for this week.



The Natural History of Selborne by Gilbert White. An eighteenth century clergyman-naturalist's collected letters to fellow naturalists, observing the flora and fauna of his parish. Rather pretentiously, I always have this by the bed - I often find it soothing to read a few pages about the mating and migratory habits of swallows before I go to sleep.



Lined up next I have all the Dorothy L. Sayers 'Lord Peter Wimsey' mysteries, courtesy of Amazon. I've not read the early ones for a while and I am starting at the beginning of the series and working through in chronological order ... fun, but I am also experiencing elbow-tingling horror at some of the racist attitudes and class stereotyping that it was acceptable to include in popular fiction in the twenties.



Tuesday, 16 November 2004

a40 madness

During one of the more volatile periods of my relationship with Crazy Tom, we decided that a short spring break in West Wales was just what we needed to chill out and sort ourselves out. So we rented a romantic cottage for two on the cliffs and off we went.



Gosh, the mistakes you make in your twenties.



It was a terrible, terrible week. We argued constantly, about what to do, where to go, whether we wanted to be together. And once, about me being unsupportive of his weight-loss programme by eating a small piece of chocolate.



We argued about something on the way home in the car, and Tom's driving became really erratic. He used to use the car to scare me - it took ages after I left to lose the scars on the palms of my hands caused by my nails as I sat on my clenched fists as he threw the car around corners.



We pulled in to a car-park in Haverfordwest and I said that unless he calmed down, I was getting the train home.



He promised to calm down.



We started off again.



We started arguing again.



He started slewing the car all over the road and lashing out at me again.



Eventually I yelled at him to pull over again.



I got out of the car, got my bag out of the boot and legged it back towards Haverfordwest, along the grass verge on the side of the A40, sobbing.



He leapt out of the car and followed me.



I turned round, legged it back to the car, got in, locked all the doors and drove off.



After a couple of miles it became obvious to me that it wasn't really safe for me to be driving and having hysterics at the same time, so I stopped in a layby and had a cup of tea out of my thermos. About half an hour later I saw Tom's hat, bobbing over the crest of the hill, in the driving rain. He walked down the hill and stood by the passenger door of the car.



I leant over and opened it.



He got in and said "Shall we go home?"



I said "Yes, okay." and started the engine.



And we never referred to it again.





a40 madness

During one of the more volatile periods of my relationship with Crazy Tom, we decided that a short spring break in West Wales was just what we needed to chill out and sort ourselves out. So we rented a romantic cottage for two on the cliffs and off we went.



Gosh, the mistakes you make in your twenties.



It was a terrible, terrible week. We argued constantly, about what to do, where to go, whether we wanted to be together. And once, about me being unsupportive of his weight-loss programme by eating a small piece of chocolate.



We argued about something on the way home in the car, and Tom's driving became really erratic. He used to use the car to scare me - it took ages after I left to lose the scars on the palms of my hands caused by my nails as I sat on my clenched fists as he threw the car around corners.



We pulled in to a car-park in Haverfordwest and I said that unless he calmed down, I was getting the train home.



He promised to calm down.



We started off again.



We started arguing again.



He started slewing the car all over the road and lashing out at me again.



Eventually I yelled at him to pull over again.



I got out of the car, got my bag out of the boot and legged it back towards Haverfordwest, along the grass verge on the side of the A40, sobbing.



He leapt out of the car and followed me.



I turned round, legged it back to the car, got in, locked all the doors and drove off.



After a couple of miles it became obvious to me that it wasn't really safe for me to be driving and having hysterics at the same time, so I stopped in a layby and had a cup of tea out of my thermos. About half an hour later I saw Tom's hat, bobbing over the crest of the hill, in the driving rain. He walked down the hill and stood by the passenger door of the car.



I leant over and opened it.



He got in and said "Shall we go home?"



I said "Yes, okay." and started the engine.



And we never referred to it again.





Monday, 15 November 2004

new-to-me

I have taken my own John Peel meme advice and listened to a lot of wild and wacky new-to-me music over the last couple of weeks, some of it actually from Peel Sessions. However, since I am terrible at actually remembering any names of either tracks or bands, I am going to have trouble passing the results of my research on - the exception in this case being The Mountain Goats 'Palmcorder Yajna', which I think is fantastic.



new-to-me

I have taken my own John Peel meme advice and listened to a lot of wild and wacky new-to-me music over the last couple of weeks, some of it actually from Peel Sessions. However, since I am terrible at actually remembering any names of either tracks or bands, I am going to have trouble passing the results of my research on - the exception in this case being The Mountain Goats 'Palmcorder Yajna', which I think is fantastic.



jam

I haven't blogged for the last couple of weeks because I have spent the time doing various things of a bizarre / boring nature.



a) Removing a thin film of jam from the inside of B's car, and the set and slide projectors belonging to the theatre company B is working with at the moment that were in the car when the Jam Event took place.

Cause:

Inadequate pot lids on eight jars during journey home from Somerset.

Types of jam:

plum, rasperry, blackcurrent.

Removal difficulty on scale of 1 - 10:

Plum - 6, Rasperry - 8, Blackcurrent - 11.

Mental notes to self for future whilst travelling with jam:

1 Place jam in upright position.

2 Pack jam well in upright position.

3 Do not place badly packed jam next to expensive technical equipment.

4 Travel with babywipes.

b) Getting the windscreen wipers on B's car fixed. You wouldn't think this was complicated, would you? Take car to garage. Get them to fix wipers. Collect car when completed. It has taken them three days and numerous apologetic phone calls, partly because they broke another bit whilst replacing the bit that was already broken. I have decided that I would almost prefer to stop the car every hundred yards and scoop the rain off with a tea-spoon than go through the process again.



c) Trying to co-ordinate and book a christmas outing for the small number of people who have worked for us this year. I am not going to bore you with this one.



d) Obsessively bidding for wool on ebay. Everyone I know is going to get a matching tea-cosy, hat, scarf, mitten and egg-cosy set for christmas. However, I now have so much wool that I can't pick a colour to start knitting with. [sigh]. I thought I'd bid for something small to try to overcome my Range Cooker Obsession - however, I probably have enough yarn to knit my own range now, so not sure if this strategy has worked.



e) Travelling around the country after B like a lost puppy. He has been on tour with a contemporary theatre company, which has involved small arts-centre-type venues such as Portsmouth, Coventry and Uley. The (brill) Prema Arts Centre in Uley is in an old church in a small village in Gloucestershire and is allegedly run by vampires ... at least, that is what one of the actors I spoke to last week had concluded. She searched the whole venue without finding a mirror in which to check her costume.



Anyway, we are now home.



Good things about this include:

Sleeping in ones own bed

There was only one pile of cat-sick to clear up

The house is warm



Bad things:

Postman had left ebay parcel of Dorothy L Sayers novels on the step in the rain. Luckily they were already slightly foxed.



B has gone off again today for a couple of days and I am looking forward to a few evenings alone with Lord Peter Wimsey.

jam

I haven't blogged for the last couple of weeks because I have spent the time doing various things of a bizarre / boring nature.



a) Removing a thin film of jam from the inside of B's car, and the set and slide projectors belonging to the theatre company B is working with at the moment that were in the car when the Jam Event took place.

Cause:

Inadequate pot lids on eight jars during journey home from Somerset.

Types of jam:

plum, rasperry, blackcurrent.

Removal difficulty on scale of 1 - 10:

Plum - 6, Rasperry - 8, Blackcurrent - 11.

Mental notes to self for future whilst travelling with jam:

1 Place jam in upright position.

2 Pack jam well in upright position.

3 Do not place badly packed jam next to expensive technical equipment.

4 Travel with babywipes.

b) Getting the windscreen wipers on B's car fixed. You wouldn't think this was complicated, would you? Take car to garage. Get them to fix wipers. Collect car when completed. It has taken them three days and numerous apologetic phone calls, partly because they broke another bit whilst replacing the bit that was already broken. I have decided that I would almost prefer to stop the car every hundred yards and scoop the rain off with a tea-spoon than go through the process again.



c) Trying to co-ordinate and book a christmas outing for the small number of people who have worked for us this year. I am not going to bore you with this one.



d) Obsessively bidding for wool on ebay. Everyone I know is going to get a matching tea-cosy, hat, scarf, mitten and egg-cosy set for christmas. However, I now have so much wool that I can't pick a colour to start knitting with. [sigh]. I thought I'd bid for something small to try to overcome my Range Cooker Obsession - however, I probably have enough yarn to knit my own range now, so not sure if this strategy has worked.



e) Travelling around the country after B like a lost puppy. He has been on tour with a contemporary theatre company, which has involved small arts-centre-type venues such as Portsmouth, Coventry and Uley. The (brill) Prema Arts Centre in Uley is in an old church in a small village in Gloucestershire and is allegedly run by vampires ... at least, that is what one of the actors I spoke to last week had concluded. She searched the whole venue without finding a mirror in which to check her costume.



Anyway, we are now home.



Good things about this include:

Sleeping in ones own bed

There was only one pile of cat-sick to clear up

The house is warm



Bad things:

Postman had left ebay parcel of Dorothy L Sayers novels on the step in the rain. Luckily they were already slightly foxed.



B has gone off again today for a couple of days and I am looking forward to a few evenings alone with Lord Peter Wimsey.